A Final Lesson Learned from Sean Seamour II

August 14, 2009 in A Final Lesson Learned from Sean Seamour II

Just one year ago today a rogue wave estimated between 80 and 120 feet high pounced upon Sean Seamour II in the middle of the night. The miracles leading to our survival are already sung, the heroes that plucked us from the maelstrom honored, lessons learned published. Yet during the US Coast Guard award ceremony last December 19th my crewmate Rudi Snel learned still another lesson from the C-130 crew.

This photo is from the video of the rescue, later edited by NOAA and the USCG for the 25th COSPAS-SARSAT Anniversary Symposium, 34 country representatives in the State Department's Franklin Room. I could not make it across the pond, Rudy gave the presentation (video link on right menu)

This photo is from the video of the rescue, later edited by NOAA and the USCG for the 25th COSPAS-SARSAT Anniversary Symposium, 34 country representatives in the State Department’s Franklin Room. I could not make it across the pond, Rudy gave the presentation (video link on right menu)

The C-130 overflew us for the first time at about 06:30, we were only to be spotted on the sixth flyover due to the short window of visibility in the cavernous wave structure and the lack of a fluorescent canopy I had been obliged to cut away as it was embroiled in the crushed rig.
The US Coast Guard reported back to my worried mother that the life raft had been spotted with two occupants aboard while she insisted we were three. It would take another hour for them to confirm we were three.
For all the trendiness and styling of foul weather gear two of us were dressed in standard yellow the third, in red and not to be seen for quite some time!
Whether it is man overboard situation or an extreme case such as ours being seen takes precedent upon looking smart.Here is the video footage of this rescue presented to the 34 member countries at the 2007 25 year anniversary of COSPAS-SARSAT. Rescue swimmer Drew Dazzo will receive the Star of Courage from the Canadian Government in recognition. The crew with a faulty ACR GPIRB believed no rescue would be forthcoming but miracles happen, notably in the extraordinary valor an courage of the US Coast Guard crew, since distinguished for their feat, saving the lives of the crew.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zysYel6hcRA

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